Discover the emerging technologies that will change the world.

November 6-9, 2017
MIT Media Lab
Cambridge, MA

About

EmTech is your opportunity to discover future trends and to understand the technologies that will drive the new global economy.

It's where tech, business, and culture converge, and where you gain access to the most innovative people and companies in the world.

The 17th annual EmTech will examine this year’s most significant news on emerging technologies.

This Year's Themes

  • Business Impact

    The future of work

    Automation and digital technologies are destroying jobs.
    Automation and digital technologies are creating unprecedented opportunity.

    Both are true today. How can we help the workforce adapt?
  • Connectivity

    What is social media doing to society?

    Connectivity is the great promise of this era. Social media is connecting people around the world at an extraordinary pace. Yet there are important issues that we need to address if these technologies will reach their potential.
  • Intelligent Machines

    Can AI get smarter?

    What are the limitations of machine learning and other current approaches? What comes next?
  • Rewriting Life

    Next-generation brain interfaces

    How are emerging interfaces going to change computing?
  • Sustainable Energy

    Adapting to the reality of climate change

    How will new technologies help us survive and thrive in the face of climate change?
  • Meet the Innovators Under 35

    This year's list is now live on www.technologyreview.com

Who Should Attend

MIT Technology Review events consistently attract senior-level business and technology decision makers who drive the global innovation economy.

EmTech is a must-attend for:
- C-Level Executives
- Policy Leaders
- Innovators
- Tech Media
- Entrepreneurs
- Venture Investors
- IP Professionals

Speakers

Technology and business leaders driving the new global economy

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  • Viktor
    Adalsteinsson

    Group Leader, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Working to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment

    Viktor Adalsteinsson is a group leader at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, where he leads the Blood Biopsy Team, a multi-institutional collaboration to profile cancer genomes directly from blood samples. The Blood Biopsy Team includes scientists, engineers, oncologists, and computational biologists spanning his lab and others at Broad, MIT, Dana-Farber, MGH, and beyond. The goal of their research is to identify mechanisms of response and resistance to therapy, enable routine monitoring of patients with cancer, and someday provide a mechanism for early detection. Adalsteinsson holds a PhD in chemical engineering from MIT, where he developed novel approaches for functional and genomic profiling of single cells in cancer. He joined the Broad Institute as a research affiliate during his doctoral studies.
  • Ramses
    Alcaide

    CEO/Founder, Neurable

    Next-Generation Interfaces: Mind-Controlled VR

    Ramses Alcaide is an electrical engineer, neuroscientist, previous CEO of Pharo, and current CEO of Neurable. At Pharo, he managed high-impact health projects such as a malaria prediction system, a rehabilitation technology for stroke patients, and a health monitoring system. As a researcher, he has worked extensively to develop brain-computer interface (BCI) technology for people with amputations, children with cerebral palsy, and people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He was also the CTO and CSO at NeuroStride, developing their go-to-market strategy and technology. Lastly, he is also the inventor and primary developer of Neurable. His honors include the Neuroscience Innovator Award, a National Science Foundation Fellowship, and a Ford Foundation Fellowship.
  • Gene
    Berdichevsky

    CEO, Sila Nano

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Exploring new materials for better lithium-ion batteries

    Gene Berdichevsky is the CEO of Sila Nanotechnologies, an engineered materials company focused on dramatically improving the energy density of batteries. Gene cofounded the company with Professor Gleb Yushin (Georgia Institute of Technology) and Alex Jacobs (Tesla, MIT). He was the seventh employee at Tesla Motors, where he served as principal engineer on the Roadster battery: the world's first safe, mass-produced automotive lithium-ion battery system. Gene holds an MS in engineering with a focus on energy and materials and a BS in mechanical engineering, both from Stanford University. He has coauthored 37 patents in the areas of battery systems and energy storage materials.
  • Elizabeth
    Bramson-Boudreau

    Chief Executive Officer and Publisher, MIT Technology Review

    Elizabeth Bramson-Boudreau is the CEO and publisher of MIT Technology Review, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s media company. MIT Technology Review’s analysis, features, interviews, and events explain the impact of new technologies on business and society.

    Elizabeth is leading the growth, expansion, and modernization of MIT Technology Review’s media platforms and products, including U.S. and international websites, newsletters, events, and an award-winning print magazine. Elizabeth also serves as chair of the global entrepreneurial network MIT Enterprise Forum.

    Elizabeth has a 20-year background in building and running teams at world-leading media companies. She maintains a keen focus on new ways to commercialize media content to appeal to discerning, demanding consumers as well as B2B audiences.

    Prior to joining MIT Technology Review, Elizabeth was the global managing director of the Economist Corporate Network (whose parent company publishes The Economist magazine), where she led editorial content creation, sales, marketing, and event operations. She also spent a decade working as a consultant.

    Elizabeth holds an executive MBA from the London Business School, an MSc from the London School of Economics, and a bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College.
  • Tracy
    Chou

    Founding Advisor, Project Include

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Bringing tech’s dismal diversity numbers out into the open

    Tracy Chou is an entrepreneur, software engineer, and diversity advocate. From 2011 to 2016 Tracy was an engineer and tech lead at Pinterest, with roles in home feed and recommendations, ad products, Web, infrastructure, API, e-mail, and growth. Before Pinterest, she worked at Quora, also as an engineer. During the previous federal administration, she was on reserve with the U.S. Digital Service as a technical consultant as well.

    Alongside her engineering career, Tracy is most well-known for her work pushing for diversity in tech. In 2013, she helped kick off the wave of tech-company diversity disclosures with a Github repository collecting numbers on women in engineering. Tracy is now a founding member of Project Include and an advisor to Homebrew VC, and she enjoys working with startups on engineering, product, culture, and diversity. She was named to Forbes’s Tech 30 under 30 in 2014 and has been profiled in Vogue, Wired, the Atlantic, and other outlets.

    Tracy graduated from Stanford with an MS in computer science and a BS in electrical engineering.
  • Abdigani
    Diriye

    Research Scientist, IBM Research Africa

    2017 Innovator Under 35: A computer scientist who founded Somalia’s first incubator and startup accelerator

    Dr. Abdigani Diriye is a research scientist, a manager for the financial services research group at IBM Research Africa, and the cofounder of Innovate Ventures, the leading startup accelerator and technology fund in Somalia. At IBM, Dr. Diriye and his team design, develop, and deploy innovative and commercially viable technologies to extend access to financial services in Africa. Dr. Diriye has held research positions at companies and academic institutions such as Fuji-Xerox Palo Alto Labs, the Open University, Microsoft Research, and Carnegie Mellon University and has also founded a fintech startup. He has published over 35 papers and patents in leading scientific outlets, and holds a bachelor’s, master’s and PhD in computer science from the University of London. Dr. Diriye is a TED Fellow and a Next Einstein Forum Fellow, and he has been listed as one of 35 innovators under 35 by MIT Technology Review. His work has also been featured by Forbes, Wired, Quartz, BBC Radio, CNN, and Fast Company, among others.
  • Phillipa
    Gill

    Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2017 Innovator Under 35: An empirical method for measuring Internet censorship

    Phillipa Gill is an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her work focuses on many aspects of computer networking and security, with a focus on designing novel network measurement techniques to understand online information controls, network interference, and interdomain routing. She currently leads the ICLab project, which is working to develop a network measurement platform specifically for online information controls. She was included on N2Women’s list of 10 women in networking to watch in 2016 and was recognized on MIT Technology Review’s list of top 35 innovators in 2017. She has received the NSF Career award, the Google Faculty Research Award, and best paper awards at the ACM Internet Measurement Conference (characterizing online aggregators) and Passive and Active Measurement Conference (characterizing interconnectivity of large content providers).
  • Tallis
    Gomes

    CEO, Singu

    2017 Innovator Under 35: An “Uber for beauty”

    Tallis Gomes is the founder of Easy Taxi, the largest taxi app in the world, which under his management expanded to 35 countries on four continents. Easy Taxi has merged with Cabify in one of the three largest tech M&A deals in Brazilian history. He is a Forbes 30 under 30 entrepreneur, was selected by MIT Technology Review as one of the top 10 Brazilian young innovators, has been listed by the main scientific magazine in Brazil as one of the 25 most influential people in the Brazilian Internet, and was named Young Leader of the Year by the Latin Trade Foundation in Miami. Nowadays Tallis is CEO and founder of Singu, the biggest beauty and wellness marketplace in Brazil, and author of Nada Easy, a best-selling Brazilian business book.
  • Kathy
    Gong

    CEO, WafaGames

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Developing new models for entrepreneurship in China

    A serial entrepreneur, Kathy cofounded WafaGames in 2017 with Radwan Kasmiya (chief designer/producer) and Joe Wu Mingzhou (CTO). WafaGames is a mobile game developer based in Beijing that promotes digital dignity through great gaming experiences supported by authentic content, innovative core game play, and breakthrough technology. Kathy was the youngest national chess champion at the age of 10, in 1996, and again at 12, in 1998. She is a member of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Council (CPPCC) in Chengdu; a former member of the Foundation Board of Global Shapers Community World Economic Forum (2013-2016); cochair of the APEC Women Leadership Forum in 2013-2014; and Image Ambassador of Chengdu’s Young Entrepreneurs. In 2011 and 2013, she was named one of the Top Ten Entrepreneur Representatives of China’s Economic Innovation. In 2012, Kathy founded an independent non-for-profit organization, World’s Young Voices, to sponsor young grassroots student elites who are academically and/or socially outstanding. She advocates for the importance of failures in entrepreneurship and still plays on chess.com with chess masters around the world.
  • Ian
    Goodfellow

    Staff Research Scientist, Google Brain

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Invented a way for neural networks to get better by working together

    Ian Goodfellow is a staff research scientist at Google Brain studying artificial intelligence. He is best known as the inventor of generative adversarial networks and as the lead author of the deep-learning textbook (www.deeplearningbook.org). He is one of the leading researchers in the emerging field of AI security, studying adversarial examples and how to prevent them. He founded the Self-Organizing Conference on Machine Learning and co-created the CleverHans adversarial example library. He leads a research group within Google Brain studying adversarial techniques in AI.
  • Yasmin
    Green

    Director of Research and Development, Jigsaw at Google

    Addressing Online Threats to Global Security

    Yasmin Green is the director of research and development for Jigsaw, a technology incubator within Alphabet that focuses on solving global security challenges through technology. Yasmin was previously head of strategy and operations for Google Ideas, the precursor of Jigsaw. She received her BS in economics from University College London and her MS in management from the London School of Economics and the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. Yasmin was also a member of the 1996 England Junior Women’s National Basketball team.
  • Kris
    Hammond

    Chief Scientist and Cofounder, Narrative Science

    AI’s Language Problem

    Kristian Hammond is a professor of computer science at Northwestern and cofounder of the artificial-intelligence company Narrative Science, where he focuses on advanced natural-language generation (NLG) and the democratization of information. At Northwestern, he is the faculty lead of the University’s CS + X initiative and has been looking at how computational thinking can be used to transform fields such as law, medicine, and education. He believes in making machines smarter with the goal of humanizing computers so as to stop the process of mechanizing people. Kris received his PhD from Yale University.
  • Svenja
    Hinderer

    Scientist, Fraunhofer IGB

    2017 Innovator Under 35: A design for a heart valve that’s biodegradable—potentially eliminating the need for repeat surgeries

    Dr. Svenja Hinderer is a group leader and deputy head of department at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology (IGB). She completed her PhD at the University of Stuttgart in 2014. In 2015, she was awarded the prestigious Deutscher Studienpreis by the Körber Stiftung for the best PhD thesis in natural sciences and engineering in Germany. Her research focuses on the generation of biomimicking and functional biomaterials for application in regenerative medicine. Since 2014, she has also taught biomedical technology at the Eberhard Karls University Tübingen.
  • Reid
    Hoffman

    Cofounder, LinkedIn; Partner, Greylock Partners

    The Future of Work

    Reid Hoffman cofounded LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional networking service, in 2003. LinkedIn is thriving with more than 450 million members around the world and a diversified revenue model that includes subscriptions, advertising, and software licensing. He led LinkedIn through its first four years and to profitability as chief executive officer. He previously served as executive vice president at PayPal, where he was also a founding board member.

    Reid joined Greylock Partners in 2009. He focuses on building products that can reach hundreds of millions of participants and businesses that have network effects. He currently serves on the boards of Airbnb, Edmodo, Convoy, Blockstream, and a few early-stage companies still in stealth mode. In addition, he is a board member of a number of not-for-profit organizations, including Kiva, Mozilla Corporation, Endeavor, and CZI Biohub. Prior to joining Greylock, he was an angel investor in many influential Internet companies, including Facebook, Flickr, Last.fm, and Zynga.

    Reid is the coauthor of two New York Times best-selling books: The Start-up of You and The Alliance. His next book is focused on “blitzscaling,” based on his Stanford course of the same name.

    Reid earned a master’s degree in philosophy from the University of Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar, and a bachelor’s degree with distinction in symbolic systems from Stanford University. In 2010 he was the recipient of an SD Forum Visionary Award and named a Henry Crown Fellow by the Aspen Institute. In 2012, he was honored with the Martin Luther King Center’s Salute to Greatness Award. Also in 2012, he received the David Packard Medal of Achievement from TechAmerica and an honorary doctor of law degree from Babson University.
  • John
    Holdren

    Professor, Harvard University

    Climate Disruption: Technical Approaches to Mitigation and Adaptation

    John P. Holdren is the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at the Kennedy School of Government; co-director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy in the Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; and professor of environmental science and policy in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University. He is also senior advisor to the director at the Woods Hole Research Center. From January 2009 to January 2017, he was President Obama’s science advisor.

    Dr. Holdren earned SB and SM degrees from MIT and a PhD from Stanford in aerospace engineering and theoretical plasma physics. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also a foreign member of both the Royal Society of London and the Indian National Academy of Engineering and a former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His other honors include one of the first MacArthur Prizes (1981), the Volvo International Environment Prize (1993), the Tyler Prize for Environment (2000), and the Heinz Prize for Public Policy (2001).
  • Joi
    Ito

    Director, MIT Media Lab

    The Future of Work

    Joi Ito is the director of the MIT Media Lab, professor of the practice at MIT and the author, with Jeff Howe, of Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future (Grand Central Publishing, 2016).

    Ito is chairman of the board of PureTech Health and serves on several other boards, including those of the New York Times Company, the MacArthur Foundation, and the Knight Foundation. He is also the former chairman and CEO of Creative Commons, and a former board member of ICANN, the Open Source Initiative, Sony, and the Mozilla Foundation.

    A serial entrepreneur, Ito helped start and run numerous companies, including one of the first Web companies in Japan, Digital Garage, and the first commercial Internet service provider in Japan, PSINet Japan/IIKK. He has been an early-stage investor in many companies, including Formlabs, Flickr, Kickstarter, littleBits, and Twitter.

    He has received numerous awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oxford Internet Institute and the Golden Plate Award from the Academy of Achievement, and he was inducted into the SXSW Interactive Festival Hall of Fame in 2014. He has also been awarded honorary doctorates from the New School and Tufts University and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Ito will be a visiting professor of the practice at the Harvard Law School from July 1, 2017, through June 30, 2020.
  • Mary Lou
    Jepsen

    Founder, Openwater

    Capturing Our Imagination: The Evolution of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    Dr. Mary Lou Jepsen is the founder of Openwater, whose goal is a wearable with MRI-plus resolution that can enable telepathy as well as drastically transform diagnostic costs for health care. Previously she was an engineering executive at Facebook, Oculus, Google[x], and Intel. In addition, Mary Lou has founded four startups, including One Laptop per Child, where she was CTO and chief architect and delivered the $100 laptop to mass production. Her startup CEO experience includes a stint at the world’s only fabless display screen company, which was based in Taipei. She has been a professor at both MITs: RMIT in Australia and MIT in Cambridge. She is an inventor on well over 100 published or issued patents and has shipped billions of dollars’ worth of consumer electronics on the hairy edge of what the physics will do. She has been recognized with many awards, including <,i>Time magazine’s “Time 100” as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, and as a CNN top 10 thinker.
  • David
    Keith

    Professor, Harvard University; Founder, Carbon Engineering

    The Growing Case for Geoengineering

    David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy technology, and public policy for 25 years. His work is focused on the science, technology, and public policy of solar geoengineering. He took first prize in Canada’s national physics prize exam, won MIT’s prize for excellence in experimental physics, and was one of Time magazine’s Heroes of the Environment. David is a professor of applied physics in Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, a professor of public policy in the Harvard Kennedy School, and founder of Carbon Engineering, a company developing technology to capture carbon dioxide from ambient air.
  • Will
    Knight

    Senior Editor for AI, MIT Technology Review

    Will Knight is a senior editor at MIT Technology Review, covering artificial intelligence, machine learning, robotics, self-driving cars, and human-machine collaboration. Will grew up in London, and was previously an editor at New Scientist magazine in the UK.
  • Bill
    Liu

    Founder and CEO, Royole Corporation

    2017 Innovator Under 35: His flexible components could change the way people use electronics

    Dr. Bill Liu is the founder and CEO of Royole Corporation, a leading innovator and manufacturer of next-generation human-machine interface technologies and products such as advanced flexible displays, flexible sensors, and smart devices. Dr. Liu founded Royole with his Stanford friends in 2012, and it achieved a global valuation of $3 billion in just four years, making it one of the fastest-growing tech startups. As the company founder, Dr. Liu was recognized as an honoree of MIT Technology Review's 2017 Innovators Under 35 list. He was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2017 and one of the Top 10 Most Innovative Entrepreneurs in the U.S. and China by Forbes in 2015, among several other honors. Prior to founding Royole, Dr. Liu worked at IBM in New York from 2009 to 2012. He received a PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2009, and BS and MS degrees with honors in electronic engineering from Tsinghua University in 2004 and 2006.
  • Lorenz
    Meier

    Founder, PX4; Pioneer Fellow, ETH Zurich

    2017 Innovator Under 35: An open-source autopilot for drones

    Robotics will be driven by software ecosystems, which are necessary to connect the robots from different manufacturers to services in the cloud. I founded the Pixhawk project in 2008 and I maintain full-time a number of widely adopted aerial robotics open-source and open hardware projects, including PX4 (autopilot software and hardware), MAVLink, and QGroundControl (cross-platform ground control station). These projects form the Dronecode software ecosystem for aerial robotics.
  • Rachel
    Metz

    Senior Editor for Mobile, MIT Technology Review

    As MIT Technology Review’s senior editor for mobile, Rachel Metz covers a wide variety of startups and writes gadget reviews out of the San Francisco office. Before arriving at MIT Technology Review in early 2012, Rachel spent five years as a technology reporter at the Associated Press, covering companies including Apple, Amazon, and eBay, and penning reviews. She has also worked as a freelancer, covering both technology and crime for the New York Times.
  • Andrew
    Ng

    Founder, Deeplearning.ai; Adjunct Professor, Stanford University

    The State of AI

    Dr. Andrew Ng is a globally recognized leader in artificial intelligence. He was until recently chief scientist at Baidu, where he led the company’s approximately 1,300-person AI group and was responsible for driving its global AI strategy and infrastructure. He was also the founding lead of the Google Brain team. In addition, Dr. Ng is co-chairman and cofounder of Coursera, the world’s leading MOOC (massive open online course) platform, and an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford University. He has authored or coauthored over 100 research papers in machine learning, robotics, and related fields. He holds degrees from Carnegie Mellon University, MIT, and the University of California, Berkeley.
  • Tomaso
    Poggio

    Investigator, McGovern Institute; Eugene McDermott Professor, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT

    Understanding Intelligence

    Tomaso Poggio is Eugene McDermott Professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He is a founding member of the McGovern Institute and is also the director of the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, a multi-institutional collaboration headquartered at the McGovern Institute. He joined the MIT faculty in 1981, after 10 years at the Max Planck Institute for Biology and Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany. He received a PhD in 1970 from the University of Genoa. Poggio is a foreign member of the Italian Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was awarded the 2014 Swartz Prize for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience.
  • Iyad
    Rahwan

    Associate Professor, MIT

    Iyad Rahwan is an associate professor at the MIT Media Lab, where he leads the Scalable Cooperation group. A native of Aleppo, Syria, Rahwan holds a PhD from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and is an affiliate faculty at the MIT Institute of Data, Systems, and Society. Rahwan's work lies at the intersection of computer science and the social sciences, with a focus on collective intelligence, large-scale cooperation, and the social aspects of artificial intelligence. He led the winning team in the U.S. State Department's Tag Challenge, using social media to locate individuals in remote cities within 12 hours using only their mug shots. Recently, he crowdsourced 30 million decisions from people worldwide about the ethics of AI systems. Rahwan's work has appeared in major academic journals, including Science and PNAS, and features regularly in major media outlets, including the New York Times, the Economist, and the Wall Street Journal.
  • Antonio
    Regalado

    Senior Editor for Biomedicine, MIT Technology Review

    Antonio Regalado is the senior editor for biomedicine for MIT Technology Review. He looks for stories about how technology is changing medicine and biomedical research. Before joining MIT Technology Review in July 2011, he lived in São Paulo, Brazil, where he wrote about science, technology, and politics in Latin America for Science and other publications. From 2000 to 2009, he was the science reporter at the Wall Street Journal and later a foreign correspondent.
  • Franziska
    Roesner

    Assistant Professor, University of Washington

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Preparing for the security and privacy threats that augmented reality will bring

    Franziska (Franzi) Roesner is an assistant professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, where she co-directs the Security and Privacy Research Lab. Her research focuses on investigating and improving computer security and privacy in existing and emerging technologies, with a particular focus on issues that directly impact end users. For example, her work has focused on contexts including the Web, smartphones, sensitive user groups (e.g., journalists and their sources), and emerging augmented reality (AR) and IoT platforms. She is the recipient of an MIT Technology Review "Innovators Under 35" Award, an Emerging Leader Alumni Award from the University of Texas at Austin, an NSF Career Award, a best paper award at the IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy, and a William Chan Memorial Dissertation Award; her early work laying a research agenda for AR security and privacy was featured on the cover of Communications of the ACM. She is a member of the DARPA ISAT advisory group and the program cochair of USENIX Enigma 2018. She received her PhD from the University of Washington in 2014 and her BS from the University of Texas at Austin in 2008.
  • Deb
    Roy

    Director, MIT Media Lab Laboratory for Social Machines; Associate Professor, MIT; Chief Media Scientist, Twitter

    Applied AI: Engineering Positive Social Change

    Roy is director of the Laboratory for Social Machines, an associate professor at MIT, and chief media scientist of Twitter. He leads research at MIT at the intersection of human and machine communication, advises technology startup companies, and serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.  He was cofounder and CEO of Bluefin Labs, a social TV analytics company, which MIT Technology Review named  one of the 50 most innovative companies of 2012. Bluefin had over 100 of the world’s largest advertisers and TV networks as clients, including P&G, Nike, CBS, and Fox. It was acquired by Twitter in 2013, Twitter’s largest acquisition at the time. Roy is an author of over 100 academic papers in machine learning, cognitive modeling, and human-machine interaction, and his widely viewed TED talk “Birth of a Word” used data visualizations to intuitively explain his research. A native of Canada, he received a bachelor of applied science in computer engineering from the University of Waterloo and a PhD in media arts and sciences from MIT. He is @dkroy on Twitter.
  • Daniela
    Rus

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT; Director, MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

    Robots in the Workplace

    Daniela Rus is the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. Her research interests are in robotics, mobile computing, and data science. Rus is a 2002 MacArthur fellow, a fellow of ACM, AAAI, and IEEE, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She earned her PhD in computer science from Cornell University.
  • Olga
    Russakovsky

    Assistant Professor, Princeton University

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Employed crowdsourcing to vastly improve computer-vision system

    Dr. Olga Russakovsky is an assistant professor in the computer science department at Princeton University. Her research is in computer vision, closely integrated with machine learning and human-computer interaction. She completed her PhD at Stanford University and her postdoctoral fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University. She was awarded the PAMI Mark Everingham Prize as one of the leaders of the ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge, received an NSF Graduate Fellowship, and was named one of the top 35 innovators under 35 by MIT Technology Review. In addition to her research, she cofounded the Stanford AI Laboratory’s outreach camp SAILORS to educate high school girls about AI. She then cofounded and continues to serve as a board member of the AI4ALL foundation, dedicated to educating a diverse group of future AI leaders.
  • Austin
    Russell

    Founder and CEO, Luminar

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Better sensors for safer automated driving

    Austin is an applied physicist and founder and CEO of Luminar. He founded the company in 2012 with a vision to develop a new type of lidar for the autonomous-vehicle industry. Five years, 170 people, and $36 million in funding later, the company has emerged with a new kind of system designed to make autonomous vehicles both safe and scalable. Before founding Luminar, he worked on several photonics projects, some of which involved building custom 3-D mapping sensors. Austin started independent research at the Beckman Laser Institute at age 16, after which he briefly attended Stanford in the applied physics department. He subsequently accepted a Thiel Fellowship to focus full time on Luminar.
  • Michael
    Saliba

    Marie Curie Fellow, EPFL

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Finding ways to make promising perovskite-based solar cells practical

    Dr. Michael Saliba is a Marie Curie Fellow based at EPFL. He completed his PhD in 2014 at Oxford University. His research focuses on understanding and improving the optoelectronic properties of emerging photovoltaic technologies for a sustainable energy future, with an emphasis on perovskite solar cells. In 2016, he received the Young Scientist Award of the German University Association.
  • Angela
    Schoellig

    Assistant Professor, University of Toronto

    2017 Innovator Under 35: Her algorithms are helping self-driving and self-flying vehicles get around more safely

    Angela Schoellig is an assistant professor at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, associate director of the Centre for Aerial Robotics Research and Education at U of T, and instructor of Udacity’s flying-car nanodegree program. She conducts research at the interface of robotics, controls, and machine learning. Her goal is to enhance the performance, safety, and autonomy of robots by enabling them to learn from past experiments and from each other. Self-flying and self-driving vehicles are her platforms of choice. She is a recipient of a Sloan Research Fellowship, a Canadian Ministry of Research, Innovation & Science Early Researcher Award, and a Connaught New Researcher Award. She is one of Robohub’s 2013 “25 women in robotics you need to know about,” winner of MIT’s 2015 Enabling Society Tech Competition, a 2015 finalist in Dubai’s $1 million “Drones for Good” competition, and the youngest member of the 2014 Science Leadership Program, which promotes outstanding scientists in Canada. Her PhD was awarded the ETH Medal and the 2013 Dimitris N. Chorafas Foundation Award (as one of 35 worldwide).
  • Andrew
    Schwartz

    Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh

    Dr. Schwartz received his PhD from the University of Minnesota in 1984 and did postdoctoral work at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with Dr. Apostolos Georgopoulos, who was developing the concept of directional tuning and population-based movement representation in the motor cortex. While there, Schwartz was instrumental in developing the basis for three-dimensional trajectory representation in the motor cortex. In 1988, he began his independent research career at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, where he developed a paradigm to explore the continuous cortical signals generated throughout volitional arm movements and then teamed up with engineering colleagues at Arizona State University to develop cortical neural prosthetics. The work has progressed to the point that human subjects can now use these recorded signals to control motorized arm and hand prosthetics to feed themselves and perform other tasks of daily living. Schwartz moved to the Neurosciences Institute in San Diego in 1995 and then to the University of Pittsburgh in 2002. In addition to the prosthetics work, he has continued to utilize neural trajectory representation to better understand the transformation from intended to actual movement using motor illusions in a virtual-reality environment.
  • James
    Temple

    Senior Editor for Energy, MIT Technology Review

    James Temple is the senior editor for energy at MIT Technology Review. James is focused on clean energy and the use of technology to combat climate change. Previously, James was a senior director at the Verge, deputy managing editor at Recode, and columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Elizabeth
    Woyke

    Senior Editor for Business, MIT Technology Review

    As the senior editor for business, Elizabeth Woyke is focused on writing stories that explore the important question: what is the future of work when AI, automation, and on-demand services are altering how we define what a job is and who qualifies as an employee? Other areas of interest include new models for workforce training and education, how companies are increasing employee diversity and inclusion, and startups that are developing innovative workplace tools and technologies.

    Elizabeth began her career at Time Asia, followed by staff jobs at BusinessWeek and Forbes. More recently, she co-authored an e-book for O’Reilly Media about the gig economy and wrote a book called The Smartphone: Anatomy of an Industry, which was published in 2014.
  • Jianxiong
    Xiao

    Chief Executive Officer, AutoX, Inc.

    2017 Innovator Under 35: His company AutoX aims to make self-driving cars more accessible

    Jianxiong Xiao (aka Professor X) is the founder and CEO of AutoX, a high-tech startup working on AI software for self-driving vehicles. AutoX's mission is to democratize autonomy and make autonomous driving universally accessible to everyone. Its innovative camera-first self-driving solution costs only a tiny fraction as much as traditional lidar-based approaches. Dr. Xiao has over 10 years of research and engineering experience in computer vision, autonomous driving, and robotics. In particular, he is a pioneer in the fields of 3-D deep learning, RGB-D recognition and mapping, big data, large-scale crowdsourcing, and deep learning for robotics. He received a BEng and MPhil in computer science from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2009. He received his PhD from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.
  • Feng
    Zhang

    James and Patricia Poitras Professor in Neuroscience, MIT; Investigator, McGovern Institute

    Presented by the Lemelson-MIT Program

    Feng Zhang is a pioneer of the revolutionary CRISPR gene-editing technology, as well as TAL effectors and optogenetics. Zhang and his team were first to develop and demonstrate successful methods for using an engineered CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit genomes in living mouse and human cells, and they have turned CRISPR technology into a practical and shareable collection of tools for robust gene editing among academic researchers worldwide.

    Zhang is a core member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, an investigator at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research, James and Patricia Poitras Professor in Neuroscience at MIT, and associate professor in the Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Biological Engineering at MIT. He also cofounded Editas Medicine in 2013, with other leading researchers in genome editing, to translate the promise of genome editing science into a broad class of transformative genomic medicines.

    Zhang won the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize in 2017 for his inventions, his commitment to collaboration and mentorship, and his dedication to improving our world through innovative solutions.
  • Yibiao
    Zhao

    Cofounder and CEO, iSee AI

    Engineering Common Sense

    Yibiao Zhao is the cofounder and CEO of iSee AI, a startup working on humanistic AI for autonomous driving. The mission of iSee AI is to accelerate the advent of human-like autonomy by bringing artificial drivers to auto and transportation markets. Yibiao completed his PhD at UCLA, studying computer vision, and his postdoc at MIT, studying cognitive robots. He is a pioneer of engineering common sense for visual understanding and cognitive robots, and he is the cochair of the interdisciplinary workshop series at the CVPR and CogSci conferences.

Featured Speaker: Andrew Ng

Founder, Deeplearning.ai
Adjunct Professor, Stanford University

Session: The State of AI

EmTech 2017 Schedule

2017 Agenda

Monday, November 6, 2017

  • 6:00
    VIP Welcome Event

    Private welcome event for EmTech MIT speakers, Innovators Under 35, and special guests

    *Innovation Circle registration required

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

  • 8:00
    Registration & Breakfast
  • 9:00
    Opening Remarks

    A welcome from MIT Technology Review.

  • 9:15
    The State of AI

    Deep Learning in Practice
    A global view of the latest advancements in the field of deep learning and the growing significance of real-world AI applications.

    Andrew Ng Founder, Deeplearning.ai; Adjunct Professor, Stanford University
    The State of AI
  • 9:45
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    An introduction to the 2017 Innovators Under 35 honorees.

    Ian Goodfellow Staff Research Scientist, Google Brain
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Invented a way for neural networks to get better by working together
    Kathy Gong CEO, WafaGames
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Developing new models for entrepreneurship in China
    Bill Liu Founder and CEO, Royole Corporation
    2017 Innovator Under 35: His flexible components could change the way people use electronics
  • 10:30
    Break & Networking
  • 11:00
    AI’s Next Leap Forward

    An update from experts who are pushing the boundaries of AI research, and reimagining collaboration between humans and machines.

    Tomaso Poggio Investigator, McGovern Institute; Eugene McDermott Professor, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT
    Understanding Intelligence
    Kris Hammond Chief Scientist and Cofounder, Narrative Science
    AI’s Language Problem
    Yibiao Zhao Cofounder and CEO, iSee AI
    Engineering Common Sense
  • 12:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2017 Innovators Under 35 honorees.

    Austin Russell Founder and CEO, Luminar
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Better sensors for safer automated driving
    Angela Schoellig Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Her algorithms are helping self-driving and self-flying vehicles get around more safely
    Lorenz Meier Founder, PX4; Pioneer Fellow, ETH Zurich
    2017 Innovator Under 35: An open-source autopilot for drones
    Jianxiong Xiao Chief Executive Officer, AutoX, Inc.
    2017 Innovator Under 35: His company AutoX aims to make self-driving cars more accessible
  • 12:30
    Lunch & Networking
  • 2:00
    Adapting to the reality of climate change

    How will new technologies help us survive and thrive in the face of climate change?

    John Holdren Professor, Harvard University
    Climate Disruption: Technical Approaches to Mitigation and Adaptation
    David Keith Professor, Harvard University; Founder, Carbon Engineering
    The Growing Case for Geoengineering
  • 3:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2017 Innovators Under 35 honorees.

    Gene Berdichevsky CEO, Sila Nano
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Exploring new materials for better lithium-ion batteries
    Michael Saliba Marie Curie Fellow, EPFL
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Finding ways to make promising perovskite-based solar cells practical
    Franziska Roesner Assistant Professor, University of Washington
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Preparing for the security and privacy threats that augmented reality will bring
  • 3:30
    Break & Networking
  • 4:00
    Next-generation brain interfaces

    How are emerging computing interfaces going to change medicine?

    Andrew Schwartz Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh
  • 4:30
    Technology Spotlight: Mind-controlled VR
    Ramses Alcaide CEO/Founder, Neurable
    Next-Generation Interfaces: Mind-Controlled VR
  • 5:00
    Lemelson-MIT Prize Honors & Reception

    Hosted by the Lemelson-MIT Program

    Feng Zhang James and Patricia Poitras Professor in Neuroscience, MIT; Investigator, McGovern Institute
    Presented by the Lemelson-MIT Program

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

  • 8:00
    Registration & Breakfast
  • 9:00
    Robots for Everyday Life

    Envision a future with robots integrated into our lives at work, at home, and at play.

    Daniela Rus Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT; Director, MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
    Robots in the Workplace
  • 9:30
    AI and the Future of Work

    How can we anticipate and respond to major disruptions from Artificial Intelligence, the Web, and social media to the way we work, learn, cooperate, and govern society?

    Iyad Rahwan Associate Professor, MIT
  • 10:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2017 Innovators Under 35 honorees.

    Tracy Chou Founding Advisor, Project Include
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Bringing tech’s dismal diversity numbers out into the open
    Olga Russakovsky Assistant Professor, Princeton University
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Employed crowdsourcing to vastly improve computer-vision system
  • 10:30
    Break & Networking
  • 11:00
    What is social media doing to society?

    Connectivity is the great promise of this era. Social media is connecting people around the world at an extraordinary pace. Yet there are important issues that we need to address if these technologies will reach their potential.

    Yasmin Green Director of Research and Development, Jigsaw at Google
    Addressing Online Threats to Global Security
  • 11:30
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2017 Innovators Under 35 honorees.

    Phillipa Gill Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    2017 Innovator Under 35: An empirical method for measuring Internet censorship
  • 12:30
    Lunch & Networking
  • 2:00
    Capturing Our Imagination: The Evolution of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    How are emerging interfaces going to change computing?

    Mary Lou Jepsen Founder, Openwater
    Capturing Our Imagination: The Evolution of Brain-Machine Interfaces
  • 2:30
    The Future of Work

    Reid Hoffman in conversation with Joi Ito on the next wave of innovation in the digital era, and the future of work.

    Joi Ito Director, MIT Media Lab
    The Future of Work
    Reid Hoffman Cofounder, LinkedIn; Partner, Greylock Partners
    The Future of Work
  • 3:00
    Break & Networking
  • 3:30
    Big Problems, Big Data Solutions

    How can insights gained from big data and machine learning help us monitor the social impact of new technologies?

    Deb Roy Director, MIT Media Lab Laboratory for Social Machines; Associate Professor, MIT; Chief Media Scientist, Twitter
    Applied AI: Engineering Positive Social Change
  • 4:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2017 Innovators Under 35 honorees.

    Svenja Hinderer Scientist, Fraunhofer IGB
    2017 Innovator Under 35: A design for a heart valve that’s biodegradable—potentially eliminating the need for repeat surgeries
    Viktor Adalsteinsson Group Leader, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
    2017 Innovator Under 35: Working to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment
    Tallis Gomes CEO, Singu
    2017 Innovator Under 35: An “Uber for beauty”
    Abdigani Diriye Research Scientist, IBM Research Africa
    2017 Innovator Under 35: A computer scientist who founded Somalia’s first incubator and startup accelerator
  • 5:00
    2017 Innovator Under 35 Awards & Reception

    Celebrating the 2017 Innovators Under 35

Thursday, November 9, 2017

  • 9:00
    Registration & Breakfast
  • 9:30
    Learning Sessions

    A half-day deep dive into one of MIT Technology Review's major themes

    *Innovation Circle or Premium Pass registration required

    Business Impact Learning Session | Fostering Entrepreneurship at All Levels
    Cohosted by the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship; moderated by Elizabeth Woyke, MIT Technology Review Senior Editor for Business
    Welcome breakfast followed by remarks from Managing Director William Aulet, student startup pitches, and a hands-on attendee exercise.

    Connectivity Learning Session | Employment, Security, and Privacy in an age of Big Data and AI
    Cohosted by the MIT Media Lab Human Dynamics Group; moderated by Rachel Metz, MIT Technology Review Senior Editor for Mobile
    A presentation by group leader and Connection Science initiative leader Alex “Sandy” Pentland and a sampling of Human Dynamics ongoing research projects. Breakfast provided.

    Rewriting Life Learning Session | The Evolution of Brain Imaging
    Cohosted by the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT; moderated by Antonio Regalado, MIT Technology Review Senior Editor for Biomedicine
    Welcome remarks from Director Robert Desimone, research presentations and Q&A, followed by interactive tours of the McGovern MRI, EEG, and MEG labs. Breakfast provided.

    Sustainable Energy Learning Session | Energy Alternatives: The Potential of Fusion Power Technology
    Cohosted by the MIT Plasma Science Fusion Center; moderated by James Temple, MIT Technology Review Senior Editor for Energy
    An introduction to the possibilities of plasma fusion as an alternative energy source and walk-through tour of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the MIT PSFC’s fusion experiment. Speakers include Dennis Whyte, Zachary Hartwig, and Robert Mumgaard. Session will conclude with a networking lunch.

Book your stay.

This season is an especially busy time in the Boston/Cambridge area.

Don't miss out on discounted hotel rates for EmTech attendees.

News + Views

Computing

We Need Computers with Empathy

An emerging trend in artificial intelligence is to get computers to detect how we’re feeling and respond accordingly. They might even help us develop more compassion for one another.

Mobile

Who Is Thinking About Security and Privacy for Augmented Reality?

While the technology and applications underlying AR are rapidly advancing, little thought has been given to how these systems should protect users.

Mobile

How Blockchain Could Give Us a Smarter Energy Grid

Energy experts believe that blockchain technology can solve a maze of red tape and data management problems.

Energy

Did Climate Change Fuel California’s Devastating Fires? Probably.

A long drought and a record hot summer set the conditions for a brutal wildfire season.

In the heart of the MIT campus

This event takes place at the MIT Media Lab, in the heart of the MIT campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Here you can't help but feel the excitement and inspiration of being at the top university in the world, surrounded by the top technology minds anywhere.

MIT Media Lab
Building E14
75 Amherst Street
Cambridge, MA 02139
View on a campus map »

Venue + Travel

November 6-9, 2017
MIT Media Lab
Cambridge, MA

MIT Media Lab

EmTech happens at the MIT Media Lab in the heart of the MIT campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Here you can't help but feel the excitement and inspiration of being at the top university in the world, surrounded by the top technology minds anywhere.

MIT Media Lab
Building E14
75 Amherst Street

(Corner of Ames and Amherst)
Cambridge, MA 02139

Conference Location: Entire 6th floor of Building E14

Hotel information

Boston Marriott Cambridge

Discounted Conference Rate:
$329/night plus tax
See more details

Explore historic Cambridge from the modern comfort and convenience of the Boston Marriott Cambridge. Located steps away from the popular Kendall Square, our hotel is situated next to the city's top shopping, dining, and entertainment venues, and offers superb access to world-class institutions like Harvard University and MIT. Upon arrival, guests will be checked-in to their spacious guest rooms and suites, all of which feature thoughtful details like plush bedding, high-speed Internet access, and 32-inch LCD TVs. Take time to visit our on-site fitness center and indoor pool facility before heading to our lobby Starbucks® for a morning coffee, or dine with us at Champions, our signature American restaurant.

 

Book online at the discounted rate »

 

You may also reserve your stay by phone at: 1-800-228-9290 or 617-494-6600. Be sure to mention the EmTech room block.

 

The group rate expires on October 15, 2017.

Hyatt Regency Cambridge

Discounted Conference Rate:
$269/night plus tax
See more details

Hyatt Regency Cambridge is located along the scenic Charles River overlooking the Boston skyline and is in the midst of two uncommonly exciting cities, Boston and Cambridge. Discover Boston and Cambridge at a hotel just minutes from Boston, adjacent to MIT, Harvard and Boston Universities. The Hyatt's guests are greeted with a dynamic 16-story atrium lobby featuring 470 newly renovated guestrooms. Zephyr on the Charles is the hotel's full service restaurant featuring eclectic dining, extraordinary views and authentic service. The state-of-the art Hyatt Stay Fit Health Club features a 75 ft heated indoor pool, eucalyptus sauna and steam room.

 

Book online at the discounted rate »

 

Reserve your room by phone at: 617-492-1234. Be sure to mention the EmTech room block.

 

The group rate expires on October 15, 2017.

Directions

MIT is located on the north shore of the Charles River Basin in Cambridge, MA, USA. The campus is within three miles of two major interstate highways and less than six miles from a major international airport; it is accessible via public transportation. MIT is a 15-30 minute walk from downtown Boston (depending on the weather). MIT is a 30-40 minute walk from Harvard University, which is located just up the river from MIT.

Via Public Transportation

MBTA ("The T") Subway — Take the Red Line subway to the Kendall/MIT Station.

The Media Lab is located on the Red Line at the "Kendall/MIT" stop of the subway. You can transfer to the Red Line without additional fees from any other subway line at the appropriate station. Please check the subway map at your boarding point for more detailed information.

At the Kendall/MIT stop, you will surface on Main Street in Kendall Square. Landmarks include the Marriott Hotel and the MIT Coop. Facing Main Street, with the Marriott Hotel and the MIT Coop to your back, proceed right (west) to the first traffic light. This is the intersection of Main Street and Ames Street, with Legal Seafoods on the corner. Turn left onto Ames Street. The Media Lab is about halfway down the block, the second building on the left at 20 Ames Street. It is a large, contemporary, white­tiled building. Adjacent and connected to E15 is the new Media Lab expansion building (E14); its address is 75 Amherst Street. For information on Boston's public transportation system, including maps and schedules for bus, subway, and commuter rail service, please consult the MBTA.

From Logan Airport

By Taxi — Taxi fare from the airport is about $20­$25. During non­rush hour, the taxi ride will take about 15 minutes. During rush hour, the ride could take 30 minutes.

By Subway — From any terminal at Logan Airport, take the Silver Line bus to South Station. At South Station, change to the Red Line subway to Kendall/MIT (inbound toward Alewife). Under normal conditions the ride will take about 30 minutes; the fare is $2.00.

By Car — Leaving the airport, follow the signs to the Sumner Tunnel. Enter the tunnel and stay in the right lane. At the end of the tunnel, continue to stay in the right lane, start down an incline and bear to the right immediately at the sign for Storrow Drive. Take Exit 26 for Cambridge/Somerville. Follow the signs for Back Bay/Cambridge (do not take the exit for Cambridge/Somerville). Stay in the right lane and follow the signs for Storrow Drive Westbound. After you pass under the pedestrian walkbridges, change to the left lane and take the exit for 2A North. Turn right and cross the Harvard Bridge (Massachusetts Avenue).

Driving

From the Massachusetts Turnpike — Exit at "Brighton/Cambridge." Follow signs to Cambridge. The Doubletree Hotel will be on your right. Go straight over the bridge into Cambridge (on River Street) and take your first right onto Memorial Drive. The Charles River will be on your right. Go straight on Memorial Drive, staying to the left and going over the overpass at the Boston University (B.U.) Bridge (past MicroCenter). Staying in the left lane, pass under the next bridge, which is the Harvard Bridge (Massachusetts Avenue). The first street after that bridge, to the left, is Ames Street—but it is one way in the wrong direction. You will have to take the second left (sign says Kendall Square) onto Wadsworth Street. Take the first left onto Amherst Street. The Media Lab is at 75 Amherst Street (E14) and 20 Ames Street (E15), at the corner where Amherst Street ends at Ames Street.

From Logan Airport — Leaving the airport, take the Sumner Tunnel to 93 North. Exit right off of 93 at the Cambridge/Storrow Drive exit. When the ramp splits, bear right following signs to Storrow Drive. Exit left at the Kendall Square exit. At the traffic light, go right onto the Longfellow Bridge. Follow Main Street (Main flows into Broadway) and take a left at the second set of lights (Ames Street). The Media Lab will be on your left about a block and a half down Ames Street. Logan International Airport's Web site provides up­to­the­minute information on weather, construction, and traffic.

To Logan Airport — Drive away from the river on Ames Street, and make the first right onto Main Street. Follow Main Street to the Longfellow Bridge; proceed over the Longfellow Bridge. At the end of the bridge, there will be signage directing you to Route 93 South. Follow Route 93 South to the Airport exit. From Route I­93: From I­93, take exit 26, and follow the signs to Back Bay along Storrow Drive West, approximately 1.5 miles, to the exit for Route 2A. The exit will be on the left, just before the Harvard Bridge (Massachusetts Avenue). The Charles River will be on your right. As you cross the bridge, you will be looking at MIT. At the end of the bridge, turn right on to Memorial Drive. The first street after that bridge, to the left, is Ames Street—but it is one way in the wrong direction. You will have to take the second left (sign says Kendall Square) onto Wadsworth Street. Take the first left onto Amherst Street. The Media Lab is at 75 Amherst Street (E14) and 20 Ames Street (E15), at the corner where Amherst Street ends at Ames Street.

Cab Companies

Ambassador Brattle: 617.492.1100

Checker Cab Co.: 617.497.9000

Yellow Cab: 617.547.3000

Car Services

Boston Coach: 800.672.7676 (reservation line)

Commonwealth Limo: 617.787.5575

PlanetTran

Uber

Featured Speaker: Reid Hoffman

Cofounder, LinkedIn & Partner, Greylock Partners
In conversation with MIT Media Lab Director Joi Ito

Session: The Future of Work

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A Tradition in Technology

For more than 115 years, MIT Technology Review has been identifying important new technologies and deciphering their practical impact.

We've brought that mission and our journalism to life through EmTech since 1999, gathering the sharpest minds in the technology, engineering, academic, startup, and management communities to provide insight into the innovations that shape the world and your business.

We host EmTech events in the US, Asia, China, Dominican Republic, France, Hong Kong, India, and Mexico.

Register now

Reserve Your Spot Now

EmTech is your opportunity to glimpse the future; to begin to understand the technologies that matter and how they'll change the face of business and drive the new global economy. It's where technology, business, and culture converge. It's the showcase for emerging technologies with the greatest potential to change our lives. It's an access point to the most innovative people and companies in the world.

Innovation Circle || 4-Day Experience New Ticket Level

EmTech Welcome Experience on Nov. 6: an invitation-only networking event with Innovators Under 35, EmTech speakers, and key VIPs

Two days of conference sessions on Nov. 7 and 8

Learning Session on Nov. 9: a half-day deep dive into the topic of your choice, including a networking breakfast, an interactive session, and a lab tour or demo

Expedited onsite check-in and welcome kit

Early-access seating for EmTech MIT conference sessions

One year of Insider Premium website access and subscription to MIT Technology Review

Premium Pass || 3-day experience

Two days of conference sessions on Nov. 7 and 8

Two networking receptions on Nov. 7 and 8

Learning session on Nov. 9: a half-day deep dive into the topic of your choice, including a networking breakfast, an interactive session, and a lab tour or demo

One year of Insider Plus website access and subscription to MIT Technology Review

General Admission || 2-day experience

Two days of conference sessions on Nov. 7 and 8

Two networking receptions on Nov 7 and 8

One year Insider Basic website access and subscription to MIT Technology Review

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We are pleased to offer discounted registration to MIT alumni, MIT ILP members, past attendees, and other select groups. Please email eventsreg@technologyreview.com with questions.

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    To request a media pass for an MIT Technology Review conference, please fill out the media registration form.

    Media passes are limited, and are granted only to working journalists who intend to cover the event (see media and analyst required credentials on the form). The information you submit will be reviewed carefully, so please be as detailed as possible when filling out the form. Media credential approval for a prior MIT Technology Review conference does not guarantee approval for this event.

    Email press@technologyreview.com with any questions.

  • Cancellation Policy

    If you cancel your registration for EmTech 2017 for any reason, you must notify us in writing before October 6, 2017 for a refund less a $295 processing fee. Cancellations on and after October 6, 2017 are nonrefundable. You may transfer your registration to another person at any time by providing authorization to us in writing. All cancellations and transfers should be sent to: eventsreg@technologyreview.com.

    Your paid registration for EmTech MIT includes one year of complimentary access to our digital edition.

  • Attendee Code of Conduct

    The mission of MIT Technology Review is to inform our audience about important new technologies. We have curated a series of discussions that includes a wide range of views on the most significant technologies and trends of the year. We value diversity of ideas and perspectives from our speakers and our audience. We are proud to bring varying points of view to our stage, and are committed to providing a respectful environment for our speakers and audience. By joining us at EmTech, you agree to maintain a respectful environment during all conference events.

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