Discover where tech, business, and culture converge
September 11-14, 2018
MIT Media Lab
Cambridge, MA

About

EmTech is your opportunity to discover future trends and to understand the technologies that will drive the new global economy.

It's where tech, business, and culture converge, and where you gain access to the most innovative people and companies in the world.

Our flagship EmTech event will examine this year’s most significant news on emerging technologies.

This Year's Themes

- The Democratization of AI
Technical advances are making it possible for non-experts to apply AI in their work, accelerating the pace at which new AI solutions are deployed. The pace of automation that this technology is fueling will reach every corner of the global economy.

- Global View: Innovation in the AI Era 
Artificial-intelligence technologies are driving economic growth in every region. The rapid pace of automation that this technology is fueling brings discussions around ethics and governance to the forefront, as we work to ensure that the next wave of innovation will benefit us all.

- Sustainable Energy
The central issue of our day is the search for sustainable, affordable energy sources to power a growing and increasingly connected global population. We will examine the most innovative new approaches to meet fast-growing global demand for clean energy.

- Our Data, Ourselves—Personalized Health Care
Massive and growing databases of gene sequencing data promise long-sought breakthroughs in medicine. How will we balance the pursuit of better health with ethical questions raised by this fast-moving field, from defining acceptable applications to establishing ownership of our genetic data?

- The Future (of Computing) Is Quantum
Quantum computers are on the cusp of commercialization. What is quantum computing, and what will it be capable of?

- Promise and Perils of Blockchain
Can cryptocurrencies play a serious role in the world financial system? We assess their potential in the global economy.

- Innovators Under 35
Innovators Under 35 is an annual list that recognizes outstanding innovators, spanning a wide range of technologies, whose groundbreaking work promises to shape their fields in the coming decades. EmTech MIT is our chance to recognize the development of new technology or the creative application of existing technologies to solve the world’s biggest problems.

EmTech: where tech, business, and culture converge

Who Should Attend

MIT Technology Review events consistently attract senior-level business and technology decision makers who drive the global innovation economy.

EmTech is a must-attend for:
- C-Level Executives
- Policy Leaders
- Innovators
- Tech Media
- Entrepreneurs
- Venture Investors
- IP Professionals

Speakers

Hear from technology and business leaders driving the new global economy

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  • Ganesh
    Bell

    President, Uptake

    Preparing for Industrial AI

    Ganesh Bell is the President of Uptake, the industrial AI and IoT software leader. A proven entrepreneur, Bell has held executive positions across a rare mix of global giants, industry leaders, startups and hyper-growth companies. In 2017, he was named No. 11 in Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business in the world. Bell came to Uptake from GE, where he was the first-ever Chief Digital Officer. As CEO of GE Power Digital, he built the largest and fastest growing industrial internet business that kick-started the digital transformation of GE’s customers. Prior, Bell was the Chief Products Officer & EVP at ServiceSource and guided the company through a successful IPO. He created YouCentric’s leading CRM products and led its core development to successful acquisition by J.D.Edwards. Bell holds a BS in Mathematics from University of Madras, India, and a MS in Computer Science from North Dakota State University.
  • Michael
    Casey

    Senior Advisor, Digital Currency Initiative, MIT Media Lab

    Blockchain: A Reality Check

    Michael Casey is a senior advisor at MIT Media Lab’s Digital Currency Initiative, where his research explores the potential for blockchain technology to advance economic inclusion and improve energy efficiency. He is also a senior lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, the chairman of CoinDesk’s advisory board, and a founding member of the Global Blockchain Business Council. Before joining MIT, Casey spent 24 years as a journalist. His career started at the West Australian, progressed through four different continents, and ended in New York, where he was a global economics columnist for the Wall Street Journal. He is a frequent public speaker, a regular media commentator and the author of five books, the latest being The Truth Machine: The Blockchain and the Future of Everything, written with Paul Vigna. Casey is a graduate of the University of Western Australia and has higher degrees from Curtin and Cornell universities.
  • Alessandro
    Chiesa

    Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley

    2018 Innovator Under 35: A cryptocurrency that’s as private as cash

    Alessandro Chiesa joined UC Berkeley's faculty in the summer of 2015. Prior to that, he spent one year as a postdoctoral researcher at ETH Zürich.

    Alessandro earned his MEng and PhD at MIT CSAIL. He also earned SB degrees in Mathematics and Computer Science from MIT. While enrolled at MIT, he rowed for the heavyweight varsity crew team.

    Alessandro was born in Varese, Italy. Before coming to the US to study at MIT, he attended the European School of Varese, which awards students the European Baccalaureate.

    Alessandro enjoys many outdoor sports, including biking, climbing, mountaineering, and running.
  • Jonas
    Cleveland

    Cofounder and President, COSY Robotics

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Helping create the shopping robots of the near future

    Jonas has held senior development positions in several start-up companies. He has multiple publications and patents in mobile robotics and computer perception. He holds a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a MSE in Robotics from the University of Pennsylvania.
  • James
    Dahlman

    Assistant Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology

    2018 Innovator Under 35: His method makes it possible to test 300 drugs at once

    James Dahlman is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech Department of Biomedical Engineering, where his lab works at the interface of drug delivery, nanotechnology, genomics, and gene editing. James, who studied gene editing with Feng Zhang and RNA delivery with Robert Langer and Daniel Anderson, uses his unique background in high-throughput nanoparticle chemistry, in vivo RNA delivery, and genomics to design safer gene therapies. He has designed nanoparticles, being considered for clinical use, that deliver RNA to blood vessels in the heart and lung, and he has developed targeted combination therapies targeting five genes at once in vivo. His lab has also designed several high-throughput nanoparticle DNA bar-coding systems to measure how 200 different nanoparticles deliver drugs to cells. He has been named a Bayer Young Investigator and a Parkinson’s Disease Foundation Young Investigator. He has won numerous fellowships and research and teaching awards and was one of two Georgia Tech professors given the Women in Engineering Teaching Award in 2018. His work has been published in Nature Nano, Nature Biotech, Nature Cell Bio, Science Translational Medicine, Cell, PNAS, and other leading journals. He has given 55 invited talks around the world since he completed his PhD in 2014.
  • Sam
    Eathington

    Chief Science Officer, The Climate Corporation

    AI in Industry: Is Machine Learning the Solution to Solving the Global Food Crisis?

    Sam leads the Science organization at The Climate Corporation, where he drives the company’s research and development efforts in data science, measurement, and field research. Sam’s connection to agriculture started young, growing up on a grain and livestock farm in west-central Illinois. He brings more than two decades of experience in plant breeding and global agricultural development – contributing nearly 60 publications and patents relating to advances in agricultural technology. Prior to joining The Climate Corporation, Sam led Monsanto’s Global Plant Breeding team, overseeing one of the largest, most integrated plant genetics programs in the world. He holds a BS, MS and PhD in genetics and plant breeding from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana.
  • Fei
    Fang

    Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University

    From Theory to Practice: AI for Societal Challenges

    Fei Fang is an assistant professor at the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research lies in the field of artificial intelligence and multi-agent systems, focusing on game theory and machine learning, with applications to security, sustainability, and mobility. Her work won the Innovative Application Award at the Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence in 2016 and the Outstanding Paper Award in Computational Sustainability Track at the International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence in 2015, and her dissertation was selected as the runner-up for IFAAMAS-16 Victor Lesser Distinguished Dissertation Award. The US Coast Guard has used her research to guide patrol ships protecting the Staten Island Ferry since April 2013. Another project she was involved in, PAWS (Protection Assistant for Wildlife Security), provides predictive and prescriptive analysis for anti-poaching efforts in conservation areas around the world.
  • Chelsea
    Finn

    PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Her robots act like toddlers—watching adults, copying them in order to learn

    Chelsea Finn is a fourth-year PhD student in CS at UC Berkeley, where she works on machine learning and its intersection with robotic perception and control. She is a part of Berkeley AI Research Lab (BAIR), advised by Pieter Abbeel and Sergey Levine. She recently spent time at Google Brain.

    Before graduate school, Chelsea received a Bachelors in EECS at MIT, where she worked on several research projects, including an assistive technology project in CSAIL under Seth Teller and an animal biometrics project under Sai Ravela. She has also spent time at Counsyl, Google, and Sandia National Labs.
  • Marzyeh
    Ghassemi

    Assistant Professor, University of Toronto, Vector Institute

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Using AI to make sense of messy hospital data

    Marzyeh Ghassemi is a Visiting Researcher with Google’s Verily and a post-doc in the Clinical Decision Making Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) supervised by Dr. Peter Szolovits. She will join the University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Medicine in Fall 2018, and will be affiliated with the Vector Institute.

    Marzyeh’s research focuses on machine learning with clinical data to predict and stratify relevant human risks, encompassing unsupervised learning, supervised learning, structured prediction. Marzyeh’s work has been applied to estimating the physiological state of patients during critical illnesses, modelling the need for a clinical intervention, and diagnosing phonotraumatic voice disorders from wearable sensor data.

    Prior to MIT, Marzyeh received B.S. degrees in computer science and electrical engineering as a Goldwater Scholar at New Mexico State University, worked at Intel Corporation, and received an MSc. degree in biomedical engineering from Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar.
  • J. Alex
    Halderman

    Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan

    Hacking Democracy

    J. Alex Halderman is Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Michigan and Director of Michigan’s Center for Computer Security and Society. His research spans security and privacy, applied cryptography, Internet measurement, censorship resistance, and electronic voting, as well as the interaction of technology with politics and international affairs. Prof. Halderman is widely known for his work on election cybersecurity, which includes numerous evaluations of real-world voting systems. After the 2016 election, he advised recount initiatives in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania in an effort to detect and deter cyberattacks. In 2017, he testified to the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee about threats to election infrastructure. Beyond voting, he co-founded Let’s Encrypt, a nonprofit that helps secure over 50 million websites, and Censys, a platform for monitoring and analyzing the Internet’s attack surface. Popular Science named him one of the “brightest young minds reshaping science, engineering, and the world.”
  • Hera
    Hussain

    Founder, CHAYN

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Her tech nonprofit makes it easy for women to build a domestic-abuse case without a lawyer

    Hera Hussain is the founder of CHAYN, a global volunteer-run project crowdsourcing resources on the web to address gender-based violence. Born in Scotland, raised in Pakistan, and living in the UK, Hera knew from early on she wanted to empower women. Hera is a passionate believer in using the power of open source technology and open data to solve the world's pressing issues. When Hera isn’t running Chayn in her spare time, she works with governments and civil society to open datasets to fight corruption. Hera was on the Forbes 30 Under 30 and MIT Technology Review’s Innovators Under 35 list.
  • Archana
    Kamal

    Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell

    2018 Innovator Under 35: She solved a big problem in quantum computing by shrinking the components

    Archana Kamal’s research focuses on enabling quantum information technologies with engineered quantum systems, which can exploit and control delicate quantum effects at macroscopic scales. During both her graduate studies at Yale and postdoctoral work at MIT, Kamal actively worked at the interface of theoretical and experimental aspects of superconducting quantum circuits, which are currently the leading candidate among quantum computing platforms. While her experimental work enabled new high-coherence superconducting qubit designs, her theoretical work was instrumental in pioneering the new field of `magnet-free nonreciprocity’ – a crucial ingredient for on-chip signal processing and high-efficiency quantum measurements. She currently leads the QUEST group (for QUantum Engineering Science and Technology) at UMass Lowell, that strives to answer theoretical questions ranging from use of large scale entanglement for quantum computing, to meeting and beating quantum limits of measurement, to simulating quantum effects in the early universe.
  • Dina
    Katabi

    Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

    AI in Industry: Smart Homes, Intelligent Health Care

    Dina Katabi is the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. She is also the director of MIT’s Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a recipient of a MacArthur “genius award.” Professor Katabi received her PhD and MS from MIT in 2003 and 1999, and her BS from Damascus University in 1995. Her research focuses on innovative mobile and wireless technologies with particular application to digital health. Her research has been recognized by the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the SIGCOMM Test of Time Award, the Faculty Research Innovation Fellowship, a Sloan Fellowship, the NBX Career Development chair, and the NSF CAREER award. Her students have twice received the ACM Best Doctoral Dissertation Award in Computer Science and Engineering. Further, her work was recognized by the IEEE William R. Bennett prize, three ACM SIGCOMM Best Paper awards, an NSDI Best Paper award, and a TR10 award. Several startups, such as PiCharging and Emerald, have been spun out of her lab.
  • Will
    Knight

    Senior Editor for AI, MIT Technology Review

    Will Knight is a senior editor at MIT Technology Review, covering artificial intelligence, machine learning, robotics, self-driving cars, and human-machine collaboration. Will grew up in London, and was previously an editor at New Scientist magazine in the UK.
  • Brenden
    Lake

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and Data Science, New York University

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Getting machines to learn in the fast and flexible ways that humans can

    Brenden M. Lake is an assistant professor of psychology and data science at New York University. He received his MS and BS in symbolic systems from Stanford University in 2009 and his PhD in cognitive science from MIT in 2014. He was a postdoctoral data science fellow at NYU from 2014 to 2017. Brenden is a recipient of the Robert J. Glushko Prize for Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation in Cognitive Science. He is an MIT Technology Review Innovator Under 35, and his research was selected by Scientific American as one of the most important advances of 2016. His research focuses on computational problems that are easier for people than they are for machines, such as learning new concepts, creating new concepts, learning to learn, and asking questions.
  • Gideon
    Lichfield

    Editor in Chief, MIT Technology Review

    Gideon Lichfield has been the editor-in-chief of MIT Technology Review since December 2017. He spent 16 years at The Economist, first as a science and technology writer and then in postings to Mexico City, Moscow, Jerusalem, and New York City. In 2012 he left to become one of the founding editors of Quartz, a news outlet dedicated to covering the future of the global economy that is now widely recognized as one of the most innovative companies in digital media. Gideon has taught journalism at New York University and been a fellow at Data & Society, a research institute devoted to studying the social impacts of new technology. He grew up in the UK and studied physics and the philosophy of science.
  • Zachary
    Lipton

    Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University

    Machine Learning: The Opportunity and the Opportunists

    Zachary Chase Lipton is an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University. His research spans core machine-learning methods and their social impact, with a concentration on deep learning for time series data and sequential decision-making. This work addresses diverse application areas, including medical diagnosis, dialogue systems, and product recommendation. He completed several prolonged internships at Microsoft Research while completing his PhD at UCSD and continues to work part time as a machine-learning scientist at Amazon AI. He is the founding editor of the blog Approximately Correct and the lead author of Deep Learning: The Straight Dope, an open-source interactive book teaching deep learning through Jupyter notebooks.
  • Adam
    Marblestone

    Chief Strategy Officer, Kernel; Research Affiliate, MIT Media Lab

    2018 Innovator Under 35: He wrote the book on how to record every neuron in the brain

    Adam Marblestone is chief strategy officer of Kernel and a part-time research affiliate with the Synthetic Neurobiology group at MIT. In his PhD as a Hertz Fellow in Biophysics at Harvard, with George Church and colleagues, he coauthored experimental and theoretical papers on molecular recording devices and road-mapped approaches for whole-brain mapping. Adam also participated in the development of new epigenomic readout technologies, genome engineering methods, nano-fabrication methods and nano-manipulation systems. More recently, he has coauthored papers analyzing the understanding of cortical computation, seeking strategies to integrate deep learning and neuroscience, and proposing new designs for neural interfaces. In his work with Ed Boyden at MIT, he helped to initiate the field of optical connectomics using the combination of expansion microscopy, in situ sequencing, and machine learning. At MIT, Adam was an investigator on an IARPA-funded project to map the neural connectome through in situ sequencing of RNA bar codes. Prior to his work in brain science, Adam studied quantum nonlocality, showing how quantum entanglement can exponentially enhance certain forms of distributed computation, and assisted in the early development of caDNAno, a graphical software tool for design of 3-D DNA origami nanostructures, now the standard for the field of structural DNA nanotechnology. Adam is also a cofounder of BioBright, a company aiming to create a “smart lab” to improve biological experimentation, and a scientific advisor to the Open Philanthropy Project and to OccamzRazor. He has co-taught courses at the MIT Media Lab on cognitive integration and how to invent and deploy transformative technologies.
  • Christopher
    Monroe

    Distinguished University Professor and Bice Zorn Professor of Physics, University of Maryland

    Preparing for a Quantum Leap

    Christopher Monroe is a quantum physicist who specializes in the isolation of individual atoms for applications in quantum information science. After graduating from MIT, Monroe earned his PhD in physics in 1992 from the University of Colorado , where he paved the way toward the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation. From 1992 to 2000 he was a postdoc and then staff physicist at NIST, where he helped lead the team that demonstrated the first quantum logic gate in 1995. In 2000, Monroe became a professor of physics and electrical engineering at the University of Michigan, where he pioneered the use of single photons to couple quantum information between atoms and also demonstrated the first electromagnetic atom trap integrated on a semiconductor chip. From 2006 to 2007 he was the director of the National Science Foundation Ultrafast Optics Center at the University of Michigan. In 2007 he became the Bice Zorn Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland and a fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute. In 2008, Monroe’s group succeeded in producing quantum entanglement between two widely separated atoms and for the first time teleported quantum information over a large distance. Since 2009 his group has investigated the use of ultrafast laser pulses for speedy quantum entanglement operations, pioneered the use of trapped ions for quantum simulations of many-body models related to quantum magnetism, and proposed and made the first steps toward a scalable, reconfigurable, and modular quantum computer.
  • Prineha
    Narang

    Professor, Harvard University

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Her research on materials at the smallest scale could lead to a new generation of technologies

    Prineha Narang is an assistant professor at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Prior to joining the faculty, Prineha came to Harvard as a Ziff Environmental Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment to explore the new field of excited-state quantum materials and devices. She was also a research scholar in condensed matter theory at the MIT Department of Physics, working on new theoretical methods to describe electron-phonon coupling in materials.

    Prineha received her SB in materials science from Drexel University and an MS and PhD in applied physics from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) as a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow and Resnick Sustainability Institute Fellow. Her work focused on understanding light-matter interactions in areas ranging from quantum plasmonics to nitride optoelectronics. Prineha’s research interests lie in exploring and expanding the understanding of excited state and non-equilibrium phenomena to develop novel quantum-engineered materials and devices with applications in sensing and photodetection, energy conversion, and quantum information processing. Outside of science, she is an avid triathlete and runner.
  • Benjamin
    Neale

    Assistant Professor, Massachusetts General Hospital; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School; Associated Researcher, Broad Institute

    The Expanding Impact of Genetic Research

    Benjamin Neale is an assistant professor in the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), assistant professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), and an associated researcher at the Broad Institute. Neale is strongly committed to gaining insights into the genetics of common, complex human diseases. Neale and Mark Daly, both of whom are associated with the Broad Institute and MGH, lead the ADHD Initiative, a collaborative effort that focuses on genomic studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Neale studied at the University of Chicago and Virginia Commonwealth University, earning a B.Sc. in genetics. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in human genetics from King’s College in London, UK. Neale completed his postdoctoral training in Daly’s laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital. In addition to many local research collaborations, he also serves as advisor and analyst to international genetic research consortia on psychiatric diseases.
  • Katie
    Rae

    CEO and Managing Partner, The Engine

    Encouraging Purpose-Driven Innovation

    Katie is the CEO and managing partner of The Engine. Previously, she was a founder and managing director at Project 11 Ventures and managing director of Techstars Boston. Katie spent her early career building significant internet businesses as head of product for Microsoft Startup Labs and SVP of product at Eons. She learned the ropes of product and business development at AltaVista, RagingBull, Zip2, and Mirror Worlds. Katie currently serves as chairman of the Startup Institute, where she is also a founder. She holds an MBA from Yale University and a BA in biology from Oberlin College.
  • Alexandre
    Rebert

    Founder, ForAllSecure

    2018 Innovator Under 35: He asked, what if a computer could fix itself?

    Alex Rebert is a computer security researcher and cofounder of ForAllSecure, whose mission is to test the world's software and train future leaders in computer security. He received a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science from EPFL in 2011, and a Master from Carnegie Mellon University in 2015. He is the co-author of Mayhem, the first end-to-end system to automatically generate exploits on binaries. Mayhem found thousands of bugs and more than hundreds of exploits on real-world software. At ForAllSecure, he was leading the team working on the DARPA Cyber Grand Challenge (CGC). In 2016, the automated system he helped create won CGC.
  • Antonio
    Regalado

    Senior Editor for Biomedicine, MIT Technology Review

    Antonio Regalado is the senior editor for biomedicine for MIT Technology Review. He looks for stories about how technology is changing medicine and biomedical research. Before joining MIT Technology Review in July 2011, he lived in São Paulo, Brazil, where he wrote about science, technology, and politics in Latin America for Science and other publications. From 2000 to 2009, he was the science reporter at the Wall Street Journal and later a foreign correspondent.
  • Ronald L.
    Rivest

    Institute Professor, MIT

    Understanding the Global Rise of Cyber Insecurity

    Professor Rivest is an Institute Professor at MIT, which he joined in 1974 as a faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a member of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), a member of the lab’s Theory of Computation Group, and a founder of its Cryptography and Information Security Group. He is a coauthor (with Cormen, Leiserson, and Stein) of the text Introduction to Algorithms. He is also a founder of RSA Data Security, now named RSA Security (the security division of EMC), Verisign, and Peppercoin. Professor Rivest has research interests in cryptography, computer and network security, electronic voting, and algorithms.
  • David
    Rotman

    Editor, MIT Technology Review

    David Rotman is the editor of MIT Technology Review. He supervises editorial for both the print magazine and the website. A science and business journalist, he has written extensively on chemistry, biotechnology, materials science, and environmental issues. He joined MIT Technology Review in January 1998 as a senior editor covering nanotechnology. Before joining MIT Technology Review, Rotman was managing senior editor at Chemical Week magazine in New York City, where he supervised coverage of technology, research, and environmental issues. He has a BS degree from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.
  • Ashutosh
    Saxena

    Founder and CEO, Caspar

    2018 Innovator Under 35: When his smart speakers didn’t work as well as hoped, he built a better system

    Ashutosh Saxena is CEO and cofounder (with chief scientist David Cheriton) of the high-tech startup Caspar.ai by Brain of Things.

    Previously, Ashutosh spent four years as an assistant professor in the computer science department at Cornell University, where he founded the Robot Learning Lab and cofounded Zibby. His vision is to build artificial intelligence for embodied systems such as robots, cars, and homes. He received his PhD from Stanford University in artificial intelligence.
  • Manan
    Suri

    Assistant Professor, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi

    2018 Innovator Under 35: His computer chips mimic the workings of the human brain

    Dr. Manan Suri is an assistant professor at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IIT-Delhi) and founder of a deep-tech hardware startup called Cyran AI Solutions, based in New Delhi, India. His research interests include semiconductor nonvolatile memory technology and unconventional computing hardware for neuromorphic and machine learning. He received his PhD from INP-Grenoble, France (2013), and his master’s (2010) and bachelor’s (2009) degrees from Cornell University. He has worked at NXP Semiconductors in Belgium and CEA-LETI in France. He holds US and international patents, serves as scientific advisor and steering committee member for leading neuromorphic hardware companies, and has coauthored book chapters and published 45+ papers in reputed conference proceedings and journals. He is a visiting scientist at CNRS in France and serves as committee member and reviewer for IEEE journals and conferences. His honors include the NASI Young Scientist Award, Young Faculty Fellowship, IEI Young Engineers Award, and Laureat du Prix.
  • James
    Temple

    Senior Editor for Energy, MIT Technology Review

    James Temple is the senior editor for energy at MIT Technology Review. James is focused on clean energy and the use of technology to combat climate change. Previously, James was a senior director at the Verge, deputy managing editor at Recode, and columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Josh
    Tenenbaum

    Professor of Computational Cognitive Science, MIT

    Human Intelligence and the Future of AI

    Josh Tenenbaum is a professor of computational cognitive science in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT, a principal investigator at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and a thrust leader in the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines. His research centers on perception, learning, and common-sense reasoning in humans and machines, with the twin goals of better understanding human intelligence in computational terms and building more human-like intelligence in machines. Algorithms developed by his group are currently used around the world.

    Tenenbaum received his PhD from MIT in 1999 and was an assistant professor at Stanford University from 1999 to 2002. He has given invited keynote talks at all the major machine-learning and artificial conferences, where his papers have received awards, and has held distinguished lectureships at Stanford University, the University of Amsterdam, McGill University, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Arizona. He is the recipient of the Early Investigator Award from the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association, and the Troland Research Award from the National Academy of Sciences and is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists and the Cognitive Science Society.
  • Clara
    Vu

    Cofounder and VP of Engineering, Veo Robotics

    Robots to Cobots: Bringing Perception and Intelligence to Industrial Robots

    Clara Vu is cofounder and VP of engineering at Veo Robotics, a company that brings advanced computer vision, 3-D sensing, and AI to industrial robots, allowing them to work side by side with humans in manufacturing processes. She leads the engineering team and supports Veo Robotics’ product creation process and strategy. With over two decades of experience in robotics, Clara has developed multiple products from inception to market. She started her career at iRobot programming robots for oil well exploration; she then moved on to interactive toys and the Roomba. Prior to Veo, Clara was cofounder and director of software development for Harvest Automation, makers of mobile robots for agricultural automation. Before that, she was a product management consultant at Rethink Robotics, where she first met Veo cofounder Patrick Sobalvarro. Clara holds a BS in mathematics from Yale University.
  • Elizabeth
    Woyke

    Senior Editor for Business, MIT Technology Review

    As the senior editor for business, Elizabeth Woyke is focused on writing stories that explore the important question: what is the future of work when AI, automation, and on-demand services are altering how we define what a job is and who qualifies as an employee? Other areas of interest include new models for workforce training and education, how companies are increasing employee diversity and inclusion, and startups that are developing innovative workplace tools and technologies.

    Elizabeth began her career at Time Asia, followed by staff jobs at BusinessWeek and Forbes. More recently, she co-authored an e-book for O’Reilly Media about the gig economy and wrote a book called The Smartphone: Anatomy of an Industry, which was published in 2014.
  • Sheng
    Xu

    Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Making off-the-shelf electronics stretchable

    Sheng Xu is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Nanoengineering at UC San Diego. He received his BS in chemistry and molecular engineering from Peking University in Beijing and his PhD in materials science and engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He worked as a postdoctoral research associate in the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research group focuses on crystalline material growth for high-performance energy devices, nanosensors for intracellular action-potential recording, and wearable electronics for human-machine interface and health monitoring. His research has been recognized by a series of awards, including the 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, the Samsung Global Research Outreach Award, the TSMC Research Gold Award, and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry Prize for Young Chemists.
  • Alice
    Zhang

    CEO and Cofounder, Verge Genomics

    2018 Innovator Under 35: Using machine learning to identify new treatments for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s

    Alice has been at the forefront of systems biology research for over seven years, at the National Cancer Institute, the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, and UCLA. During this time, she has coauthored four peer-reviewed papers in high-profile journals such as Cell and Neuron. She graduated from Princeton University magna cum laude with high honors in molecular biology and is a 2012 recipient of the prestigious Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans. In 2010, she began training in the UCLA-Caltech MD/PhD program, with a focus in neuroscience; she spent five years investigating gene networks involved in neuro-regeneration. She was recently named a Forbes 2017 30 Under 30 Featured Honoree.
  • Ethan
    Zuckerman

    Director, MIT Center for Civic Media

    The Ethics of the Internet

    Ethan Zuckerman is director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT and associate professor of the practice at MIT’s Media Lab. With Rebecca MacKinnon, Ethan cofounded the international blogging community Global Voices, which showcases news and opinions from citizen media in over 150 nations and 30 languages. Ethan's research focuses on issues of internet freedom, civic engagement through digital tools, and international connections through media. He blogs at http://ethanzuckerman.com/blog and lives in the Berkshire Mountains of western Massachusetts.
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EmTech 2018 Schedule

September 11-14 Agenda

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

  • 6:00
    VIP Welcome Event

    Private welcome event for EmTech speakers, Innovators Under 35, and special guests

    *Innovation Circle registration required

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

  • 8:00
    Registration & Breakfast
  • 9:00
    A Global View: Purpose-Driven Innovation

    While emerging technologies are essential to driving economic growth, the rapid pace of automation that new technologies are fueling has brought discussions around ethics and governance to the forefront. How can we ensure that the next wave of innovation will benefit us all?

    Katie Rae CEO and Managing Partner, The Engine
    Encouraging Purpose-Driven Innovation
    Josh Tenenbaum Professor of Computational Cognitive Science, MIT
    Human Intelligence and the Future of AI
  • 10:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 10:30
    Break & Networking
  • 11:00
    Sustainable Energy

    Examining the most innovative approaches to meet fast-growing global demand for clean energy

  • 12:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 12:30
    Lunch & Networking
  • 2:00
    Questioning the Hype Around AI

    While artificial intelligence is delivering valuable solutions across many industries today, expectations are increasingly out of synch with the reality that the field is still in its very early stages. What are the dangers posed by this disconnect?

    Zachary Lipton Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University
    Machine Learning: The Opportunity and the Opportunists
  • 2:30
    Technology Spotlight: Intelligent Robots

    Combining the latest advances in artificial intelligence with robots could take AI to the next level.

    Clara Vu Cofounder and VP of Engineering, Veo Robotics
    Robots to Cobots: Bringing Perception and Intelligence to Industrial Robots
  • 3:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 3:30
    Break & Networking
  • 4:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 4:30
    Industry Impact: Emerging Technologies at Work

    Our growing and increasingly connected global population requires smarter environments to live safer, more productive lives. From better health care and cleaner energy to more efficient food production, emerging technologies are changing the way every major industry works.

    Dina Katabi Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
    AI in Industry: Smart Homes, Intelligent Health Care
  • 5:00
    Ethics & Governance in the AI Era

    The free flow of information online was expected to promote a more cohesive and democratic society. Instead, trust in long standing institutions has been severely fractured. Can technology be part of the solution?

    Ethan Zuckerman Director, MIT Center for Civic Media
    The Ethics of the Internet
  • 5:30
    Lemelson-MIT Prize Honors & Reception

    Hosted by the Lemelson-MIT Program

    The 2018 winner of the prestigious Lemelson-MIT Prize will be announced from the stage. The honoree will be there in person to speak with the EmTech MIT audience about his or her award-winning work.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

  • 8:00
    Registration & Breakfast
  • 9:00
    The Economic Impact of AI

    We'll examine the promise of AI, as critical global industries, from energy to agriculture, prepare to scale to meet the needs of a growing population.

    Ganesh Bell President, Uptake
    Preparing for Industrial AI
    Sam Eathington Chief Science Officer, The Climate Corporation
    AI in Industry: Is Machine Learning the Solution to Solving the Global Food Crisis?
    Fei Fang Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University
    From Theory to Practice: AI for Societal Challenges
  • 10:00
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 10:30
    Break & Networking
  • 11:00
    Technology Spotlight: Quantum Computing

    Quantum computers are on the cusp of commercialization. What is quantum computing, and what will it be capable of?

    Christopher Monroe Distinguished University Professor and Bice Zorn Professor of Physics, University of Maryland
    Preparing for a Quantum Leap
  • 11:30
    Technology Spotlight: Cybersecurity

    Vulnerabilities in digital infrastructure are a concern worldwide. What can be done to address massive breaches of personal data, hacked elections, and other rising threats?

    Ronald L. Rivest Institute Professor, MIT
    Understanding the Global Rise of Cyber Insecurity
    J. Alex Halderman Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan
    Hacking Democracy
  • 12:00
    Lunch & Networking
  • 1:30
    Promise and Perils of Gene Sequencing

    With the rise in popularity of at-home DNA testing kits and growing databases of genetic data, highly sophisticated data is now more accessible than ever. This increased accessibility presents uncharted ethical terrain. For instance, what are the potential implications of widespread DNA use by law enforcement? How will we define acceptable applications, as well as genetic data ownership?

    Benjamin Neale Assistant Professor, Massachusetts General Hospital; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School; Associated Researcher, Broad Institute
    The Expanding Impact of Genetic Research
  • 2:30
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 3:00
    Break & Networking
  • 3:30
    Meet the Innovators Under 35

    Conversations with the 2018 Innovators Under 35 honorees

  • 4:00
    Blockchain: Seeking A New Model of Trust

    Can cryptocurrencies play a serious role in the world financial system? Here's a look at their potential in the global economy and the growing interest in potential applications for social good.

    Michael Casey Senior Advisor, Digital Currency Initiative, MIT Media Lab
    Blockchain: A Reality Check
  • 4:45
    Why Innovation Matters

    Solving the challenges of our day will require new approaches and new technologies. How can today’s leaders encourage the risk-taking that is required in the pursuit of new breakthroughs, while establishing ethical guidelines to ensure more purpose-driven innovation?

  • 5:15
    2018 Innovator Under 35 Awards & Reception

    Celebrating the 2018 Innovators Under 35

Friday, September 14, 2018

  • 9:00
    Registration & Breakfast
  • 9:30
    Learning Sessions

    A half-day deep dive into one of MIT Technology Review's major themes

    *Innovation Circle or Premium Pass registration required

In the heart of the MIT campus

This event takes place at the MIT Media Lab, in the heart of the MIT campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Here you can't help but feel the excitement and inspiration of being at the top university in the world, surrounded by the top technology minds anywhere.

MIT Media Lab
Building E14
75 Amherst Street
Cambridge, MA 02139
View on a campus map »

News + Views

Business

MIT Technology Review’s new design—and new mission

Tech journalism shouldn’t just explain technology, but seek to make it more of a force for good.

Ji Xu

He helped build a payment system that lets anyone with an internet connection use financial services.

Yin Qi

His face-recognition platform transformed the way business is done in China.

Speaker Nominations

We’re gathering the experts who’ll give you the inside track on the technologies and businesses that are disrupting industries, creating entirely new markets, and changing society.

Venue + Travel

MIT Media Lab
Cambridge, MA

MIT Media Lab

EmTech happens at the MIT Media Lab in the heart of the MIT campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Here you can't help but feel the excitement and inspiration of being at the top university in the world, surrounded by the top technology minds anywhere.

MIT Media Lab
Building E14
75 Amherst Street

(Corner of Ames and Amherst)
Cambridge, MA 02139

Conference Location: Entire 6th floor of Building E14

Hotel information

Hyatt Regency Cambridge

Discounted Conference Rate:
$219/night plus tax
See more details

Hyatt Regency Cambridge is located along the scenic Charles River overlooking the Boston skyline and is in the midst of two uncommonly exciting cities, Boston and Cambridge. Discover Boston and Cambridge at a hotel just minutes from Boston, adjacent to MIT, Harvard and Boston Universities. The Hyatt's guests are greeted with a dynamic 16-story atrium lobby featuring 470 newly renovated guestrooms. Zephyr on the Charles is the hotel's full service restaurant featuring eclectic dining, extraordinary views and authentic service. The state-of-the art Hyatt Stay Fit Health Club features a 75 ft heated indoor pool, eucalyptus sauna and steam room.

 

Book online at the discounted rate »

 

You may also reserve your stay at 617-492-1234. Be sure to mention the EmTech room block.

 

The group rate expires on August 19, 2018.

Boston Marriott Cambridge

Discounted Conference Rate:
$289/night plus tax
See more details

Explore historic Cambridge from the modern comfort and convenience of the Boston Marriott Cambridge. Located steps away from the popular Kendall Square, our hotel is situated next to the city's top shopping, dining, and entertainment venues, and offers superb access to world-class institutions like Harvard University and MIT. Upon arrival, guests will be checked-in to their spacious guest rooms and suites, all of which feature thoughtful details like plush bedding, high-speed Internet access, and 32-inch LCD TVs. Take time to visit our on-site fitness center and indoor pool facility before heading to our lobby Starbucks® for a morning coffee, or dine with us at Champions, our signature American restaurant.

 

Book online at the discounted rate »

 

You may also reserve your stay by phone at: 1-800-228-9290 or 617-494-6600. Be sure to mention the EmTech room block.

 

The group rate expires on August 20, 2018.

Directions

MIT is located on the north shore of the Charles River Basin in Cambridge, MA, USA. The campus is within three miles of two major interstate highways and less than six miles from a major international airport; it is accessible via public transportation. MIT is a 15-30 minute walk from downtown Boston (depending on the weather). MIT is a 30-40 minute walk from Harvard University, which is located just up the river from MIT.

Via Public Transportation

MBTA ("The T") Subway — Take the Red Line subway to the Kendall/MIT Station.

The Media Lab is located on the Red Line at the "Kendall/MIT" stop of the subway. You can transfer to the Red Line without additional fees from any other subway line at the appropriate station. Please check the subway map at your boarding point for more detailed information.

At the Kendall/MIT stop, you will surface on Main Street in Kendall Square. Landmarks include the Marriott Hotel and the MIT Coop. Facing Main Street, with the Marriott Hotel and the MIT Coop to your back, proceed right (west) to the first traffic light. This is the intersection of Main Street and Ames Street, with Legal Seafoods on the corner. Turn left onto Ames Street. The Media Lab is about halfway down the block, the second building on the left at 20 Ames Street. It is a large, contemporary, white­tiled building. Adjacent and connected to E15 is the new Media Lab expansion building (E14); its address is 75 Amherst Street. For information on Boston's public transportation system, including maps and schedules for bus, subway, and commuter rail service, please consult the MBTA.

From Logan Airport

By Taxi — Taxi fare from the airport is about $20­$25. During non­rush hour, the taxi ride will take about 15 minutes. During rush hour, the ride could take 30 minutes.

By Subway — From any terminal at Logan Airport, take the Silver Line bus to South Station. At South Station, change to the Red Line subway to Kendall/MIT (inbound toward Alewife). Under normal conditions the ride will take about 30 minutes; the fare is $2.00.

By Car — Leaving the airport, follow the signs to the Sumner Tunnel. Enter the tunnel and stay in the right lane. At the end of the tunnel, continue to stay in the right lane, start down an incline and bear to the right immediately at the sign for Storrow Drive. Take Exit 26 for Cambridge/Somerville. Follow the signs for Back Bay/Cambridge (do not take the exit for Cambridge/Somerville). Stay in the right lane and follow the signs for Storrow Drive Westbound. After you pass under the pedestrian walkbridges, change to the left lane and take the exit for 2A North. Turn right and cross the Harvard Bridge (Massachusetts Avenue).

Driving

From the Massachusetts Turnpike — Exit at "Brighton/Cambridge." Follow signs to Cambridge. The Doubletree Hotel will be on your right. Go straight over the bridge into Cambridge (on River Street) and take your first right onto Memorial Drive. The Charles River will be on your right. Go straight on Memorial Drive, staying to the left and going over the overpass at the Boston University (B.U.) Bridge (past MicroCenter). Staying in the left lane, pass under the next bridge, which is the Harvard Bridge (Massachusetts Avenue). The first street after that bridge, to the left, is Ames Street—but it is one way in the wrong direction. You will have to take the second left (sign says Kendall Square) onto Wadsworth Street. Take the first left onto Amherst Street. The Media Lab is at 75 Amherst Street (E14) and 20 Ames Street (E15), at the corner where Amherst Street ends at Ames Street.

From Logan Airport — Leaving the airport, take the Sumner Tunnel to 93 North. Exit right off of 93 at the Cambridge/Storrow Drive exit. When the ramp splits, bear right following signs to Storrow Drive. Exit left at the Kendall Square exit. At the traffic light, go right onto the Longfellow Bridge. Follow Main Street (Main flows into Broadway) and take a left at the second set of lights (Ames Street). The Media Lab will be on your left about a block and a half down Ames Street. Logan International Airport's Web site provides up­to­the­minute information on weather, construction, and traffic.

To Logan Airport — Drive away from the river on Ames Street, and make the first right onto Main Street. Follow Main Street to the Longfellow Bridge; proceed over the Longfellow Bridge. At the end of the bridge, there will be signage directing you to Route 93 South. Follow Route 93 South to the Airport exit. From Route I­93: From I­93, take exit 26, and follow the signs to Back Bay along Storrow Drive West, approximately 1.5 miles, to the exit for Route 2A. The exit will be on the left, just before the Harvard Bridge (Massachusetts Avenue). The Charles River will be on your right. As you cross the bridge, you will be looking at MIT. At the end of the bridge, turn right on to Memorial Drive. The first street after that bridge, to the left, is Ames Street—but it is one way in the wrong direction. You will have to take the second left (sign says Kendall Square) onto Wadsworth Street. Take the first left onto Amherst Street. The Media Lab is at 75 Amherst Street (E14) and 20 Ames Street (E15), at the corner where Amherst Street ends at Ames Street.

Cab Companies

Ambassador Brattle: 617.492.1100

Checker Cab Co.: 617.497.9000

Yellow Cab: 617.547.3000

Car Services

Boston Coach: 800.672.7676 (reservation line)

Commonwealth Limo: 617.787.5575

PlanetTran

Uber

A Tradition in Technology

For more than 115 years, MIT Technology Review has been identifying important new technologies and deciphering their practical impact.

We've brought that mission and our journalism to life through EmTech since 1999, gathering the sharpest minds in the technology, engineering, academic, startup, and management communities to provide insight into the innovations that shape the world and your business.

We host EmTech events in the US, Asia, China, Dominican Republic, France, Hong Kong, India, and Mexico.

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Contact Contact Marii Sebahar at 415-416-9140 or via e-mail.

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Reserve Your Seat

Three registration options are available:

Innovation Circle || 4-day experience limited availability

VIP welcome event on Sep 11

Two full days of conference sessions and two receptions on Sep 12-13

Half-day learning session on Sep 14

Welcome kit

Expedited check-in

Reserved seating during sessions

Private lounge access

One-year Insider Plus subscription

Premium Pass || 3-day experience

Two full days of conference sessions and two receptions on Sep 12-13

Half-day learning session on Sep 14

One-year Insider Basic subscription

General Admission || 2-day experience limited availability

Two full days of conference sessions and two receptions on Sep 12-13

Your registration also includes the The Download email newsletter with the top emerging tech stories delivered daily to your inbox.

We are pleased to offer discounts to MIT alumni and other members of the MIT community, non-profit organizations, select affiliate groups, and parties of three or more. Email to inquire about your eligibility: eventsreg@technologyreview.com.

  • Media Registration

    To request a media pass for an MIT Technology Review conference, please fill out the media registration form.

    Media passes are limited, and are granted only to working journalists who intend to cover the event (see media and analyst required credentials on the form). The information you submit will be reviewed carefully, so please be as detailed as possible when filling out the form. Media credential approval for a prior MIT Technology Review conference does not guarantee approval for this event.

    Email press@technologyreview.com with any questions.

  • Cancellation Policy

    If you cancel your registration for EmTech for any reason, you must notify us in writing before August 10, 2018 for a refund less a $295 processing fee. Cancellations on and after August 10 are nonrefundable. You may transfer your registration to another person at any time by providing authorization to us in writing. All cancellations and transfers should be sent to: eventsreg@technologyreview.com.

  • Attendee Code of Conduct

    The mission of MIT Technology Review is to inform our audience about important new technologies. We are curating a series of discussions that includes a wide range of views on the most significant technologies and trends of the year. We value diversity of ideas and perspectives from our speakers and our audience. We are proud to bring varying points of view to our stage, and are committed to providing a respectful environment for our speakers and audience. By joining us at EmTech, you agree to maintain a respectful environment during all conference events.

    By registering for this event, you acknowledge that you may receive promotional messages from the event sponsor(s). You may adjust your preferences at any time by clicking on the link in the email.